FOR THE LOVE OF THE GAME: Chajul, Guatemala

Maya Ixil Youth program and Bright Star Philanthropy Partners sponsored tournament team. Program Director is MANUEL LAYNEZ.

 

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Thurston County uniforms and cleats delivered to the container ship office in Los Angles

Jerseys are the ticket to play.The Maya Ixil Youth Leadership Development Soccer/Futbol Program this fall includes youth from 168 families thanks to the generosity of the Thurston County soccer community who donated jerseys and cleats to Wembley’s Soccer Shop in Olympia, Washington,  who added samples, and their own contributions

The program Director is MANUEL LAYNEZ

 Expression of community empowerment 

Soccer can change lives and transform communities for the better. Organized with leadership development at its core, soccer equips the young people with life and leadership skills to make a change in their communities. Many have faced a life of hardship, but have excelled in social responsibility and community engagement. Soccer can change lives and transform communities for the better.

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Team Captains of /Wembley sponsored youth development teams

 Leveraging the playing field: how soccer can promote leadership development. 

New leaders are emerging with soccer as a catalyst for responsibility, leadership development and social change. Soccer is more than just a game and a multi-billion dollar industry, there is arguably no social phenomenon with the same power to inspire, unite and connect as soccer. As a global language, soccer can provide an incredibly effective and cost-efficient way to engage young people in communities with scarce resources.

 

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For the love of the game

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Maya Ixil Youth Leadership Development 

Director: MANUEL LAYNEZ

  • Sports: soccer, volley ball, basketball
  • Academics: Chess Club, Business and Agriculture
  • Community Service
  • Spiritual Harmony
  • Job Skills: Entrepreneur, Business and Agriculture

Mission:

  • to develop integrated leadership qualities in youth to prepare them for Maya Ixil leadership

Participants: 

  • Age 12 to 19, who have dropped out of school in order to work to help their families.
  • Speak the local indigenous language of Maya Ixil
  • Are orphans or come from families in extreme poverty

 

 

Contacts:  

 

DREAMS REALIZED

COURAGE TO LIVE THE DREAM

“We are happy to achieve the goal but the truth is that it is a new experience and takes a lot of courage to be living this dream.” “We are Maya Ixil. Our home and community is Chajul, el Quiche, Guatemala. We are childhood friends who started planning for a farmers’ co-op when we were 8 years old.”

“We are now 34. Our dream was born in the year that we sat by the river bank, in a high mountain jungle, and started our planning with how to survive the armed conflict raging in our home town, and for a way to get enough food for children and old people. Our childhood dreams for the farmers’ association for Maya Ixil are now a reality.

In 2011 Manuel Laynez Anay, started the organizational work of forming a non-profit association for economic improvement, to eliminate malnutrition in the Ixil area of Guatemala, support well- being, and create job opportunities in the Maya Ixil region. They wanted to create opportunities that their parents did not have. As young people their parents were organized with a similar vision, but armed conflict prevented their achievement. They were afraid to follow their dream. They were forced from their lands where they had worked and harvested a variety of agricultural products by the fear of being beheaded, burned, hanged, shot or in every sense of the word, massacred. They fled to the jungle mountains to hide, all as a result of the internal armed conflict. One misfortune of all this is that there were many young orphans without schooling and no government support and nongovernmental organizations to support the people.

  • Manuel Laynez Anay’s father was killed in the genocide massacres. 

DREAMS OF MEMORIES

Lauire Levinger, published author

Laurie Levinger, retired social worker living and writing in Vermont, between her travels to Guatemala and Spain. Laurie’s website has information about her other books, videos, and on-line testimonies. Laurie’s website

Guerra inconclusa: La voz de los sobrevivientes (Unfinished War: The Voice of the Survivors) by Laurie Levinger is a book of testimonies published in Guatemala in September 2015 (in Spanish). The book is a collection of 30 verbatim testimonies from 2005–2013. Guatemalans from many different parts of the country, from different language groups and of different ages contributed their personal stories. The book is in Spanish and is available by emailing the publisher Editorial Maya Na’oj:Sr Daniel Much, mayanaoj@gmail.com  In December 2015 books can be ordered by emailing laurie levinger: laurie@levinger.net

Bright Star Grant Consultants, Inc. serves a wide variety of clients on a global scale. For more information about our services and Bright Star Philanthropy Partner’s initiative in Central America, please contact us at: Janet @ brightstarconsultants.com

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What War?

Photo by Laurie Levinger Testimonies of Maya Survivors http://www.levinger.net/laurie/writing/what-war/

Photo by Laurie Levinger
Testimonies of Maya Survivors
http://www.levinger.net/laurie/writing/what-war/

“I remember when I was 8 years old. At that time my parents forbade me to leave the house,and nothing more than the dying could be heard. We did not know who had died”.

“When we heard the sound of gunfire near the village, my parents would not work in the field but we stayed in the house.”

“I even have a friend that can’t forget where his father died. We were around eight years old and the soldiers grabbed his father in an apple tree and burned him, still alive, in front of him.”

“It was terrible because my mom has told me that sometimes people were just thrown in the streets, with no head. There were people, already dead, but with no head, no arms, no legs. The war damaged my family because it was very hard and still today people don’t forget– at least I don’t forget– because the war marked me with that memory.”

“When I have children I will tell them how I lived. That is to help them understand that you have to appreciate yourself. But I won’t go into great depth because maybe, from my point of view, it would hurt them, maybe, their minds. But yes, I’d tell them what I went through and what happened: just like my mother told me, I also have to tell my children.”

“There is still a great deal of pain. They’re afraid, because of the war. Maybe it was because the village isn’t developed economically and intellectually because we couldn’t study, there weren’t schools then, there weren’t classes, the soldiers came and they burned the schools and the church.”

The Power of Speaking and Hearing Truth.

Laurie listens to women in Bisan, Guatemala give testimony

Laurie listens to women in Bisan, Guatemala give testimony

The experiences of Maya individuals, families and communities during the internal armed conflict have been repeated countless times in countries around the globe.The words and emotions shared in Laurie Levinger’s 2009 book, What War? Testimonies of Maya Survivors  (Cual Guerra? Testimonios de sobrevivientes Mayas) could have been given by armed conflict survivors anywhere, anytime, in any war or conflict region.

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Step Aside Bill Gates, Family Philanthropy is Possible for Everyone

WHAT IS PHILANTHROPY?

Philanthropy  means “love of humanity” in the sense of caring, nourishing, developing and enhancing “what it is to be human” on both the benefactors’ (by identifying and exercising their values in giving and volunteering) and beneficiaries’ (by benefiting) parts. The most conventional modern definition is “private initiatives, for public good, focusing on quality of life”. citated from Wikipedia.

Bright Star Philanthropy Partners  (BSPP) is a shared value community development initiative of Bright Star Grant Consultants. BSPP identifies and supports  leaders to realize solutions that they design and execute with BSPP collaborations, technical assistance, and grants.

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Tools and seeds donated for family gardens. Bright Star Philanthropy Partners volunteer Alex Larkin Chajul, Guatemala

WHAT IS THE GOOD NEWS ABOUT POVERTY?

  There doesn’t seem to be any when every day there is a news story about suffering in Africa, homelessness in our great cities, the working poor who work multiple jobs day and night to keep families together. In the face of such overwhelming problems, we tend to go numb, glaze over, and move on to the celebrity or comics page.

 The good news is that there are ways for you to reach out and create a life changing difference with a small amount of money. This is fabulous for people who have never felt able to donate to causes that they believe in. Parents of all social strata are now able to teach their children the ethic of philanthropy by making it a family project, or by making gifts of volunteerism in lieu of material gifts. Those in need benefit from lifting themselves out of poverty with pride, and thereby changing their communities for the better one person, one family at a time. The time for, “someone should do something about this” is now.

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WHAT IF YOU ARE WITHOUT A DOLLAR TO SPARE?

More and more, middle and high school students around the country are being required to perform community service hours as part of their learning experience.

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Partners With A Purpose: Food Security

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Guatemala currently has one of the highest rates of chronic malnutrition in the world. More than 65% of rural area Guatemalan children under age 5 suffer from chronic malnutrition and hunger (UNICEF). Coffee leaf infestation by the fungus Roya has destroyed up to 80% of the coffee crop of the small holder farms in the highlands of Guatemala. The economic impact of income loss for day laborers is severe. There are reports that up to 85% of the children in the rural area of Chajul, Quiche, Guatemala are at high risk for malnutrition and hunger. Some reports are saying that Guatemala is the most mal-nourished country in the western hemisphere.

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